A Blessing, pt. II – Rabat, Morocco

Once again, I must thank my buddies for showing me around the Rabat medina a few weeks back.  Y and K were fantastic guides and introduced me to neighborhoods that I have never walked through before.  I go to the medina often, though a walk with a native of Rabat is a heck of a different experience and I look forward to our next adventure. We walked through a small souk near the corniche filled with, well, stuff.  This souk – right around the corner from the shops catering to the early morning fishermen – was a totally different experience…

Independence Day – 2013

“From every mountain side, Let Freedom ring.”

My new photo assistant, Rosie, says “hello” – Rabat, Morocco

We haven’t fallen off of the face of the earth or entered witness protection – Rosie, our lovely new puppy, recently moved in with us! 

Yet another new friend in the medina pt. II – Fes, Morocco.

We aren’t silly and we certainly didn’t just fall off of the turnip truck – our furry buddy from the other day was interested in more than just looking cute and purring / chirping at us during lunch.  Specifically, he surely thought that we were his meal ticket to a fancy seafood lunch. Barring a fresh seafood lunch, he may have settled for a squab pastilla…or just the main ingredient.

Yet another new friend in the medina – Fes, Morocco.

A new friend in the medina – Fes, Morocco. 2013

I recently met this gentleman while shopping with family in the Fes medina.  His shop is directly across from the shop / workshop of another friend of ours and we chatted about home-stay programs and preservation of the medina, a sensitive subject to many of those still living inside of the medina walls.

Guarab in the medina pt.II – Marrakech, Morocco.

As repeat visitors to this site probably know, I am a fan of street performers, animal tamers, story tellers, etc., and that I have a certain fondness for guarabs, the traditional water salesmen found in medinas across Morocco.  Jemma el fnaa in Marrakech?  Guarab paradise.  Guarabs carry containers of water and are happy to pour off a cup for the equivalent of about a nickel. These men – I have never come across a female guarab – represent an interesting element of Moroccan culture, as their primary job has been displaced by access to clean running water and the prevalence…